I was just reading the newest post by Google’s Project Zero. They just released a report on a massive bug that allows remote code execution by exploiting a vulnerability on the 802.11 Broadcom SoC used in most smartphones.

Actually, the bug is not massive (it is, after all, just a simple buffer overflow because boundaries are not well checked when processing a specific type of packet), but its consequences are massive indeed. The vulnerability is specific to the parsing of certain messages in 802.11z TDLS, a mode of P2P ad-hoc communication. The report published by Gal Beniamini is just the first part of the overall project, and it “just” shows up to remote code execution on the Broadcom wifi SoC, but it hints that it can be leveraged to gain remote code execution ability in the application’s processor:

In the next blog post, we’ll see how we can use our assumed control of the Wi-Fi SoC in order to further escalate our privileges into the application processor, taking over the host’s operating system!

Long story shirt, this vulnerability results in a massive vulnerability. Theoretically (I am eager to see the second part of this report!), an attacker can take over a smartphone’s OS by simply sending malformed WiFi frames, achieving full device takeover by WiFi proximity alone. The good news is that this bug has been patched already both for iOS devices and Android devices, so I’d say you go ahead and update your mobile’s OS if you haven’t in a while.

I strongly recommend folks to read the report by Gal Beniamini, as it is excellently written and easy to understand and follow. It’s actually a great reference/introduction to buffer overflows and how to leverage them for malicious intent. The overall exploit is rather complex, but very nicely explained step by step in the report.

Fun stuff!

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