I read this morning some very interesting news about Twister, a new decentralized and anonymous Twitter-like social network. It was created by Miguel Freitas, an engineer based in Rio De Janeiro, this new micro-blogging application can’t be shut down by, for example, some nation state or large corporation. Also, Twister is designed in such a way that other users cannot know whether you are online, what your IP address is, or who you follow.

As a bitcoin “aficionado”, I find particularly interesting that the magic behind Twister is this popular alternative currency. It is another great example of the great range of potential applications that bitcoins unfold.

You can read more about this story at Wired Magazine:

Twister is surprisingly easy to use for an application that’s so new, that isn’t controlled by a central authority, and that places so much emphasis on security. Other decentralized alternatives to Twitter and Facebook — such as Pump.io, Identica and Diaspora — require that you either operate your own dedicated server or trust someone else to run a server for you. Twister works more like peer-to-peer file sharing software: Launch the app, and it connects with other users. There’s no need for a central server.

It manages this trick through the bitcoin protocol, though not the network that actually drives the digital currency. Basically, the protocol handles user registration and logins. Just as machines — called miners — verify transactions over the bitcoin network to ensure no one double-spends bitcoins and everyone spends only their own coins, a network of Twister computers verifies that user names aren’t registered twice, and that posts attached to a particular user name are really coming from that user.

Posts are handled through the BitTorrent protocol. This lets the system distribute a large number of posts through the network quickly and efficiently, and it lets users receive near-instant notifications about new posts and messages — all without the need for central servers.

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